Theme

75 years ago, on this date, Billie Holiday recorded a song that Time Magazine would call song of the century: Strange Fruit, a song written about a lynching in the South. 

Holiday first performed the song at Cafe Society in 1939. She said that singing it made her fearful of retaliation but, because its imagery reminded her of her father, she continued to sing the piece making it a regular part of her live performances. Because of the poignancy of the song, Josephson drew up some rules: Holiday would close with it; the waiters would stop all service in advance; the room would be in darkness except for a spotlight on Holiday’s face; and there would be no encore. During the musical introduction, Holiday would stand with her eyes closed, as if she were evoking a prayer.

(Source: satindolls, via ladysingsfolsomblues)

oldfilmsflicker:

I relate so hard.
oldfilmsflicker:

I relate so hard.
oldfilmsflicker:

I relate so hard.
oldfilmsflicker:

I relate so hard.
oldfilmsflicker:

I relate so hard.
oldfilmsflicker:

I relate so hard.
oldfilmsflicker:

I relate so hard.

oldfilmsflicker:

I relate so hard.

(via raccoonology)

This is not a poem

Empty buses
Tasteless food
Bitter coffee
Freezing mornings
Piles of sadness
White noise
Dirty windows
Tired eyes
Cold technology

My photo blogMy photo blogMy photo blogMy photo blog

My photo blog

(Source: arimasenarag)

My photo blogMy photo blog

My photo blog

(Source: arimasenarag)

"I’m lost by life. I don’t know anything about life. If I make a movie, I don’t even understand why I’m making the movie. I just know that there’s something there. Later on, we all get to know what it’s about through the opinions of others. If you make a film, it might as well be as important as be nonsense. You can’t go for ten cents and expect to come up with a million. You have to go for everything. Whether you fail or don’t fail, you have to go for what will make us better when we’re finished. I like to work with friends and for friends on something that might help somebody. Something with humour, sadness; simple things.
The artist really is a magical figure whom we would all like to be like and don’t have the courage to be, because we don’t have the strength to be obsessive. Film is an art, a beautiful art. It’s a madness that overcomes all of us. We’re in love with it. Money is really not that important to us. We can work thirty-six, forty-eight hours straight and feel elated at the end of that time. I think film is magic! With the tools we have at hand, we really try to convert people’s lives! The idea of making a film is to package a lifetime of emotion and ideas into a two-hour capsule form, two hours where some images flash across the screen and in that two hours the hope is that the audience will forget everything and that celluloid will change lives. Now that’s insane, that’s a preposterously presumptuous assumption, and yet that’s the hope."
John Cassavetes (via bbook)

(Source: herewithmyabsentfriend, via clairedenis)

From Points In Between by David O’haraFrom Points In Between by David O’haraFrom Points In Between by David O’haraFrom Points In Between by David O’hara
George Georgiou/Transit Ukraine: After The RevolutionGeorge Georgiou/Transit Ukraine: After The Revolution

George Georgiou/Transit Ukraine: After The Revolution

notsquared asked: Hey, thanks for the follow. You've got a great blog, you're a little miserable (like me), and you like Wes Anderson; I like these things about you. God bless, kid.

I think I already send you a message for this privately but I’m worried you may not have got it. Anyway thanks and It’s nice that we’re both on the same page miserable and all and Wes Anderson is great. I really loved The Grand Budapest Hotel :)

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